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Health Services staff work with students and parents to improve student wellness in order to support learning. Healthy students are most successful and able to learn when their physical and health-related needs are met. We also believe in the mission statement and core values of WCS and play a role in inspiring and equipping students and enriching the lives of others. Tracey Akers, BSN, RN, NCSN is the District Nurse Coordinator. 

Health Procedures

Students who are ill or injured are to secure a pass from their teacher (unless an emergency) and report directly to the Nurse’s Office to be evaluated. The school nurse will contact a parent/guardian if the student is too ill to remain at school. Please make sure ALL parent contact numbers as well as the emergency contact is up to date. Please communicate any acute or chronic medical condition your student may have to your school nurse to help assist with your student’s needs while at school.

Illnesses can be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites and can be spread from one individual to another. Please encourage good hygiene and regular hand washing at home. Parents may be asked to pick up their student from school under the following circumstances: 

1) The student has a fever of 100.4 degrees F or above; 

2) the student is vomiting and/or has diarrhea; 

3) the student has a rash that may be disease related; 

4) the student does not feel well enough to return to the classroom.

Parents should not send their student to school if he or she: 

1) has a fever of 100 .4 degrees or more. They should stay home for 24 hours after the temperature returns to normal without fever-reducing medication. 

2) Has vomited or had diarrhea. The student should stay home until 24 hours after the last episode. 

3) Has a rash that may be disease-related or from an unknown cause. 

Management of head lice is ultimately the responsibility of the parents. The WCS policy and procedure for head lice follows the guidelines recommended by the Harvard School of Public Health, CDC, American Academy of Pediatrics and the Indiana State Department of Health.

Emergency Contact Information

Parent/guardian and emergency contact information is very important and needs to be updated every year and/or when changes occur. It is important that we have your correct home, cell and work numbers as well as at least 2 emergency contact numbers who can be contacted in case your student needs emergency medical help and we are unable to reach a parent. Please be sure the emergency contacts you list are willing to pick your child up from school if you are unavailable. You can do this when you register your student online and/or by calling the school office and reporting changes.

Medication Guidelines

If your student requires a prescription medication, it is best to ask the doctor to schedule the administration times outside of school hours so it can be taken at home. If your student must take medication at school, it must be kept in the nurse’s office and must be given by the school nurse. 

Medication permission forms are available at each school and the WCS website. No prescription medication will be given unless the school has a signed medication permit on file from the physician OR the medication is in the original container with the original pharmacy label and the student’s name.

Written permission must also be on file from the student’s parent/guardian. Over-the-counter medications require the same parental authorization and original, labeled bottle as prescriptive medication. They must be administered in a manner consistent with the instructions on the label.

No herbal or vitamin supplement will be given unless the nurse has a medication permission form completed and signed by the physician and parent/guardian. They also must be in their original container labeled with the student’s name.

ALL medication should be discussed with the school nurse and kept in the nurse’s office. Exceptions to this requirement are self-administered rescue inhalers for asthma, self-administered EPI PEN for severe allergic reactions, and medication specified in an IEP, Section 504 or individual health plan.

Indiana law allows students to carry and use their inhalers/ EPI PENS IF the physician, parent, and school nurse agree the student has demonstrated appropriate knowledge and administration of the medication. Students carrying these medications have the responsibility to use them correctly and ONLY for themselves.

We ask that students report to the nurse’s office if they use their inhaler more than once during the school day. Students MUST report to the nurse’s office immediately if they use an EPI PEN. See School Board Policy #5330 “Use of Medications” for further reference.

Health Screenings

Vision acuity screening is required by Indiana Law on all students in 8th grade and will be conducted by the school nurse or trained Lions Club volunteers. Vision screening may be completed on any other student by referral.

Hearing screening is required by Indiana Law on all students in 7 grade and conducted by the Speech and Language Pathologists in the corporation. Hearing screening on any other student may be completed by referral. Any parent who does not want his/her student tested for vision or hearing screenings must send in a signed written statement to the school nurse at the beginning of each school year stating refusal of the tests.

Health Services News

Fun in the Sun - Skin Safety

Written by Justin Weaver 

Three kids in a pool handing on the edge smiling at camera

It is getting warmer outside and everyone is anxious to get out and soak up some rays. What a great feeling it is to have the sun shining on you. When outside swimming, jogging, gardening, or just playing around, be sure your skin is well protected. 

Cloudy days are when people are at most risk of sunburn because they feel that sunscreen is not necessary. The Skin Cancer Foundation reports that up to 80% of the sun’s UV rays pass through clouds making it just as easy to sunburn on overcast days.

Take these steps recommended by the Skin Cancer Foundation to protect your skin and prevent skin cancer:

  • Seek the shade, especially between 10 AM and 4 PM.
  • Don’t get sunburned. The risk of melanoma doubles if you have more than 5 sunburns over the course of a lifetime. 
  • Avoid tanning and never use UV tanning beds.
  • Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Use a broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher every day. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
  • Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours or after swimming or excessive sweating.
  • Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreens should be used on babies over the age of six months.
  • Examine your skin head-to-toe every month.
  • See a dermatologist at least once a year for a professional skin exam.
  • Be cautious when taking NSAIDS such as Aspirin, Ibuprofen, and Naproxen. They make you extra–sensitive to the sun so take special care if using these medications while being out in the sun.

Be sure to visit the website www.skincancer.org for more information relating to skin cancer and ways to prevent and detect it.